What’s Next in Science is accelerated discovery

What’s Next in Science is accelerated discovery

Scientific discovery is driven by two forces: the development of new capabilities, and the relentless tenacity of the world’s sharpest minds.

We see it as our duty to accelerate scientific progress by developing cutting-edge technologies, demonstrating scalable processes, and deploying new models of collaborative innovation.

This is how we will tackle the world’s most pressing issues, together.

Read our full vision and strategy

Scientific discovery is driven by two forces: the development of new capabilities, and the relentless tenacity of the world’s sharpest minds.

We see it as our duty to accelerate scientific progress by developing cutting-edge technologies, demonstrating scalable processes, and deploying new models of collaborative innovation.

This is how we will tackle the world’s most pressing issues, together.

Read our full vision and strategy

Workstreams

Supercharging the scientific method

We’re creating novel solutions to supercharge the scientific method, from conducting background research to testing hypotheses and analyzing results.

Building communities of discovery

We’re bringing together the sharpest minds across industry, government, and academia to solve problems collaboratively using our tools and capabilities.

Impacting at scale

We’re applying deep technical expertise to the most pressing global challenges: helping humans live longer and healthier lives, preparing society for the future of work, and mitigating the effects of climate change.

Advancing exploratory science

We’re exploring the unknown reaches of science, from manipulating single atoms, to creating new materials that don’t exist in the natural world, to exploring how biological systems might help improve man-made technologies.

Recent news

Blog

IBM boosts material discovery to make gadgets more sustainable

Climate change: IBM boosts materials discovery to improve carbon capture, separation and storage


8-Feb-2021

IBM boosts material discovery to make gadgets more sustainable

PDF

New Macromolecule Could Hold Key to Reversing Antibiotic Resistance

Read our Science & Technology Outlook


14-Jan-2021

New Macromolecule Could Hold Key to Reversing Antibiotic Resistance

IBM RXN: New AI model boosts mapping of chemical reactions

Read blog

28-Dec-2021

Blog

Boosting our understanding of microbial world with software repurposing

Boosting our understanding of microbial world with software repurposing


22-Jan-2021

Boosting our understanding of microbial world with software repurposing

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Experiments

Bringing together the Federal government, industry, and academic leaders to provide access to the world’s most powerful high-performance computing resources in support of COVID-19 research.

Join the consortium

IBM RXN for Chemistry is a state-of-the-art neural machine learning translation tool that can predict the most likely outcome of a chemical reaction using neural machine translation architectures.

Access the experiment

IBM Research is using robust generative AI frameworks to create novel molecules and drug candidates based on multiple constraints.

Access the experiment

Featured publications

Date Content Title Journal / Venue
March 2021 Paper

PaccMannᴿᴸ: De novo generation of hit-like anticancer molecules from transcriptomic data via reinforcement learning

iScience
March 2021 Paper

Accelerating antimicrobial discovery with controllable deep generative models and molecular dynamics

Nature
Feb 2021 Paper

Data-driven Molecular Design for Discovery and Synthesis of Novel Ligands - A case study on SARS-CoV-2

MLST
Jan 2021 Paper

Mapping the space of chemical reactions using attention-based neural networks

Nature Machine Intelligence
Dec 2020 Paper

Corpus processing service: A Knowledge Graph platform to perform deep data exploration on corpora

Applied AI Letters
July 2020 Paper

Molecular Inverse-Design Platform for Material Industries

KDD 2020
July 2020 Paper

Automated extraction of chemical synthesis actions from experimental procedures

Nature Communications