Our Principal Investigators Offer Expertise Across Dozens of Fields

If there is one core guiding principle at IBM Research, it’s this: We are better together than we could ever be alone. By housing scientists of many disciplines together, we’ve deliberately created an environment where any given problem can be viewed from many angles. Our researchers aren’t just diverse in their technical expertise, either. They hail from all over the world and possess a broad array of passions, hobbies, and interests. Which is to say, they’re people — people of the highest order. In this space, we’re giving you the opportunity to learn about them — as scientists, as family members, and most importantly, as fellow human beings.

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Antonio Corcoles

Antonio Corcoles, PhD

Quantum Computer
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Antonio Corcoles, PhD

Antonio Córcoles completed a PhD at Royal Holloway University of London under the supervision of Professor John Saunders. He then worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Cavendish Laboratory with Professor Sir Michael Pepper on hyperfine interactions in quantum wires. He joined IBM as a Postdoctoral Researcher in 2010 and has been a Research Staff member in the Quantum Computing group since 2014.


Luisa Bozano

Luisa Bozano, PhD

Cogniscent
IBM Research – Almaden


Luisa Bozano, PhD

Luisa Bozano has been a research scientist at IBM’s Almaden Research Center since 2000. Her research focuses on discovering and developing methods for making self-assembling molecular electronics, such as memories, aimed at being significantly cheaper than today’s silicon-based devices. A native of Genova (Genoa), Italy, Luisa earned her PhD in Physics from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 2001.


Giaocomo Nannicini

Giaocomo Nannicini, PhD

Quantum Computer Science
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

Daniel Sanders

Daniel Sanders, PhD

Accelerated Materials Discovery
IBM Research – Almaden


Daniel Sanders, PhD

Daniel P. Sanders received a Bachelor's degree in Polymer Science and Engineering (1996) and Master's degree in Macromolecular Science (1999) from Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH). Later, he received a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, CA) for his work in the research lab of Prof. Robert H. Grubbs on the transition metal-catalyzed synthesis of fluoropolymers for use as 157 nm photoresists and the synthesis of trisubstituted olefins via ruthenium-catalyzed olefin cross-metathesis.

In December 2004, he joined IBM Research - Almaden as a Research Staff Member. While at IBM, his research has focused on the development of advanced patterning materials for 193 nm immersion lithography, novel materials and integration strategies for the directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCPs), and greener synthetic routes for the preparation functionalized cyclic carbonates and polycabonates. In January 2012, he became the manager of Lithography Materials group. In January 2015, he also took over management of the Hybrid Polymeric Materials group.

During his career, Dr. Sanders has authored more than 45 technical papers in various scientific journals, conference proceedings, and trade magazines. In addition, he has been awarded 44 US patents, resulting in his being named a Master Inventor by IBM Research in 2010. He is currently an associate editor for the Journal of Micro/Nanolithography, MEMS, and MOEMS.


John Collins

John Collins, PhD

MicroBattery
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

Daniel Friedman

Daniel Friedman, PhD

Small Computer
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Daniel J. Friedman

Daniel J. Friedman received his PhD in Engineering Science from Harvard University in 1992. After completing consulting work at MIT Lincoln Labs and postdoctoral work at Harvard in image sensor design, he joined the IBM in 1994. His initial work at IBM was the design of analog circuits and air interface protocols for field-powered RFID tags.

Since 2009, Daniel has been manager of the communication circuits and systems group, adding responsibility for teams in millimeter-wave wireless and digital communications IC design. His current research interests include high-speed I/O design, PLL design, and circuit/system approaches to enabling new computing paradigms.


Augusto Vega

Augusto Vega, PhD

Adaptive Swarm Intelligence
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Augusto Vega, PhD

Augusto Vega is a Research Staff Member within the Efficient & Resilient Systems group at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. He has been involved in research and development work in the areas of highly-reliable power-efficient embedded designs, cognitive systems and mobile computing. He is a driver and promoter of the swarm intelligence (a.k.a. cloud-back mobile cognition) paradigm with potential application to autonomous/connected vehicles, drones, wearable devices, mobile health monitoring and cyber-physical systems, among others. He has several pending/issued patents and published papers, and has served on conference technical program committees in the area of highly-reliable power-efficient systems.

Augusto Vega holds a Ph.D. degree on Computer Architecture from Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Spain, and a M.Sc. degree on Computer Architecture, Networks and Systems from the same university.


Alberto Valdes Garcia

Alberto Valdes Garcia, PhD

AI Technology for the Invisible
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Alberto Valdes Garcia, PhD

Alberto Valdes Garcia is a Research Staff Member and manager of the RF Circuits and Systems Group at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. He is the winner of numerous awards, including the 2005 Best Doctoral Thesis Award presented by the IEEE Test Technology Technical Council (TTTC), and the 2007 National Youth Award for Outstanding Academic Achievements. Alberto is an industry leader with over 100 authored or co-authored publications, and his scholarly work has received more than 2,000 independent citations. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University, and is a Senior Member of IEEE and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology.

At IBM Research, Alberto has been motivated by the opportunities offered by multi-disciplinary collaborations. Some of his recent projects include the world’s first graphene integrated circuit, the first IEEE standard for 60GHz communications, and radio technology for future 5G mobile communications. Alberto is currently working to derive real-time insights about invisible physical phenomena, and to make these insights available to various industries, including security, quality control, and healthcare.


Ralf Kaestner

Ralf Kaestner, PhD

Spatial Cognition
IBM Research – Zurich

Leo Gross

Leo Gross, PhD

Nanoscopes
IBM Research – Zurich


Leo Gross, PhD

Leo Gross is a Research Staff Member at IBM Research in Zurich. Leo joined IBM after receiving his PhD in Physics from the Free University of Berlin. His work is focused on atomic and molecular manipulation by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), as well as nanostencil lithography. In 2009, he and his coworkers pioneered atomic resolution on molecules by AFM using functionalized tips. Leo is the recipient of the 2012 Feynman Prize for Nanotechnology and the Gerhard Ertl Young Investigator Award in 2010.

Leo is currently working on developing a powerful nanoscope technology that will help gain direct insight of nano-landscapes relevant across industries. The resulting technology will help gain a vantage point into new phenomena and inherent heterogeneity previously not visible, for a deeper understanding on which to build disruptive solutions.


Hendrik Hamann

Hendrik Hamann, PhD

Macroscopes
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Hendrik Hamann, PhD

Hendrik F. Hamann is a Principal Research Staff Member and Senior Research Manager at the T.J. Watson Research Center. He received his PhD from the University of Göttingen in Germany, and since joining IBM, has worked on a wide breadth of projects, from the combination of physical models, machine-learning, and big data technologies; internet of things (IoT), sensor-based physical modeling; system physics with applications in renewable energy; and energy management; as well as nanotechnology.

An IBM Master Inventor and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology, Hendrik has authored and co-authored more than 80 peer-reviewed scientific papers, holds over 90 patents, and has over 70 pending patent applications. A career innovator, he was the first to develop a novel, near-field optical microscope to study single molecules at high spatial resolution. He helped IBM win a Vintage Report Innovation Award for the wine industry, by co-developing a prototype irrigation system based on IoT technology. Outside of the lab, Hendrik is an avid long-distance runner, admiring its simplicity and using it as a means to explore nature.


Abram Falk

Abram Falk, PhD

Nanopixel Spatial Light Modulator
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

Chandra Narayanaswami

Chandra Narayanaswami, PhD

Physical Blockchain
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Chandra Narayanaswami, PhD

Chandra is passionate about innovating and tries to deeply influence both the industry and the academic communites, and transitively our society, with his efforts. He earned his PhD in Computer and Systems Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and his BTech in Electrical Engineering from IIT, Bombay. Chandra is an IEEE Fellow, a member of the IBM Academy of Technology, and holds 102 US Patents and 174 patents worldwide.

Chandra is currently investigating applications of blockchain technologies for supply chain, freight and logistics, food safety and provenance. Interesting challenges abound in operating infrastructure and efficiency, business value and financial incentives, organizational dynamics and behaviors in blockchains, data standards and interoperability, in situ blockchain applications, and in enabling data to be born on the blockchain.

Ahmet Ozcan

Ahmet Ozcan, PhD

Machine Intelligence
IBM Research – Almaden


Ahmet Ozcan, PhD

Ahmet S. Ozcan is the manager of the Machine Intelligence group at the IBM Almaden Research Center in California. He received his PhD in Physics from Boston University and joined IBM in 2006. He had worked in IBM’s Microelectronics division and contributed to the development of several CMOS technology nodes, which were commercialized in IBM P and Z server products and in mobile devices through JDA partnerships. In 2015, after an assignment in France on FDSOI technology development, Ahmet took a big interest in brain-inspired computing and moved to Silicon Valley. He and his team work on developing new algorithms guided by neuroscience and cognitive psychology. An IBM Master Inventor, Ahmet has authored and co-authored more than 40 peer-reviewed articles, holds over 45 patents and over 50 pending patent applications. Outside the lab, Ahmet enjoys photography and music.


Lior Horesh

Lior Horesh, PhD

Interpretable ML: Symbolic Regression
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

Mark Podlaseck

Mark Podlaseck

Dataspace
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Mark Podlaseck

Mark is the manager of the Dataspace project, which is an adaptive room that facilitates shared understanding. He also manages the design work for the new Q commercial prototype. Prior to that, he served as creative director on the Watson IoT center in Munich and the Watson experience center at Astor Place in New York City.

Mark holds a BA in English and American Literature from UC San Diego and an MA in Computer Science from Cal Poly. He unabashedly cops to being a dropout from a PhD program at Northwestern University, but is particularly proud of his design experience from the School of Hard Knocks.


Patrick Ruch

Patrick Ruch, PhD

Hypertaste
IBM Research – Zurich


Patrick Ruch, PhD

Patrick Ruch is a Research Staff Member in the Science & Technology department at IBM Research – Zurich. Patrick studied Materials Science at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, where he received his PhD degree in 2009 for work on electrochemical capacitors performed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). His main research interests are in energy conversion and storage with applications to efficient computing systems and sustainable energy technologies.

He is currently responsible for exploratory and applied research regarding electrochemical energy conversion, electrochemical sensing and solid sorption heat pump technology.