Our Primary Investigators Offer Expertise Across Dozens of Fields

If there is one core guiding principle at IBM Research, it’s this: We are better together than we could ever be alone. By housing scientists of many disciplines together, we’ve deliberately created an environment where any given problem can be viewed from many angles. Our researchers aren’t just diverse in their technical expertise, either. They hail from all over the world and possess a broad array of passions, hobbies, and interests. Which is to say, they’re people — people of the highest order. In this space, we’re giving you the opportunity to learn about them — as scientists, as family members, and most importantly, as fellow human beings.

Learn how to join the Institute

Ioana Baldini

Ioana Baldini, PhD

Biomimicry Explorer
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Ioana Baldini, PhD

Ioana Baldini is a Research Staff Member who is passionate about projects around Social Good and serves as a mentor in the Science for Social Good program. She is currently working on systems and tools that facilitate scientific discoveries.

Ioana got her PhD from the University of Toronto in 2012, where she worked mainly on computer architecture and runtime systems.


Luisa Bozano

Luisa Bozano, PhD

Cogniscent
IBM Research – Almaden


Luisa Bozano, PhD

Luisa Bozano has been a research scientist at IBM’s Almaden Research Center since 2000. Her research focuses on discovering and developing methods for making self-assembling molecular electronics, such as memories, aimed at being significantly cheaper than today’s silicon-based devices. A native of Genova (Genoa), Italy, Luisa earned her PhD in Physics from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 2001.


Geoffrey Burr

Geoffrey Burr, PhD

Neuromorphic Devices & Architectures
IBM Research – Almaden


Geoff Burr, PhD

Geoff Burr joined IBM in 1996 after receiving his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology. He has worked in a number of diverse areas, including holographic data storage, photon echoes, computational electromagnetics, nanophotonics, computational lithography, phase-change memory, storage class memory, and novel access devices based on mixed-ionic-electronic-conduction (MIEC) materials.

Geoff and his team are currently working on experimental hardware demonstrations of neural networks based on analog memory devices at a large scale. Geoff took up the clarinet at an early age, and is a passionate player who performs in numerous symphony and chamber music concerts a year for a local community orchestra, while also helping them with marketing and graphic arts. He also serves as a coach in a “VIP” soccer league for kids with mental and physical disabilities.


Jerry M Chow

Jerry M Chow, PhD

Quantum Computing
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Jerry M. Chow, PhD

Jerry M. Chow is the Manager of the Experimental Quantum Computing group at IBM. His technical expertise is in the area of design, measurement, and integration of superconducting quantum devices. Chow graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. in Physics and an M.S. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University in 2005 and a PhD in Physics from Yale University in 2010. He was awarded a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for his study at Yale, where he worked on implementing the first quantum processor with superconducting qubits in Professor Rob Schoelkopf’s group. He joined IBM Research as a Research Staff Member in 2010. In 2012, he was recognized in the Forbes 30 under 30 Technology list.


Emmanuel Delamarche

Emmanuel Delamarche, PhD

Bioscopes
IBM Research – Zurich


Emmanuel Delamarche, PhD

Emmanuel Delamarche leads activities on experimental biosciences at IBM Research in Zurich, where he became a Research Staff Member in 1998 after earning his PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Zurich. Emmanuel’s research is focused on personalizing and modernizing healthcare. His current projects deal with investigating intercellular pathways relevant to neurodegenerative diseases. A TEDx speaker, IBM Master Inventor, and winner of the Werner Prize of the Swiss Chemical Society, Emmanuel is one of the most cited scientists in the fields of self-assembly and microfluidics with nearly 9,000 citations. In his free time, Emmanuel loves to read anything, from Gibbon to Frazer, and Nietzsche to Lautreamont. He also enjoys podcasts from The Economist and French culture.


Daniel Friedman

Daniel Friedman, PhD

Small Computer
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Daniel J. Friedman

Daniel J. Friedman received his PhD in Engineering Science from Harvard University in 1992. After completing consulting work at MIT Lincoln Labs and postdoctoral work at Harvard in image sensor design, he joined the IBM in 1994. His initial work at IBM was the design of analog circuits and air interface protocols for field-powered RFID tags.

Since 2009, Daniel has been manager of the communication circuits and systems group, adding responsibility for teams in millimeter-wave wireless and digital communications IC design. His current research interests include high-speed I/O design, PLL design, and circuit/system approaches to enabling new computing paradigms.


Jay M Gambetta

Jay M Gambetta, PhD

Quantum Applications
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Jay M. Gambetta, PhD

Jay M. Gambetta is the manager of the Theory of Quantum Computing and Information Group at the T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. He joined IBM in 2011 to work on quantum information science. After earning his PhD from Griffith University in Australia, he conducted research in quantum information processing with superconducting circuits as a post-doctoral fellow at Yale University and at the Institute for Quantum Computing in Canada. Jay was named a fellow of the American Physical Society in 2014.

Jay believes the full potential of quantum computing is still unknown, but he thinks it reaches beyond our expectations and until we have hardware and a user base this will not be tapped. Quantum computing could lead to the discovery of new pharmaceutical drugs, completely secure cloud computing systems, unlocking new facets of artificial intelligence, developing new materials science to transform industries, searching large volumes of big data and so much more. Outside of the lab, Jay enjoys hiking, snowboarding, and biking.


Alberto Valdes Garcia

Alberto Valdes Garcia, PhD

HyperImager
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Alberto Valdes Garcia, PhD

Alberto Valdes Garcia is a Research Staff Member and manager of the RF Circuits and Systems Group at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. He is the winner of numerous awards, including the 2005 Best Doctoral Thesis Award presented by the IEEE Test Technology Technical Council (TTTC), and the 2007 National Youth Award for Outstanding Academic Achievements. Alberto is an industry leader with over 100 authored or co-authored publications, and his scholarly work has received more than 2,000 independent citations. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University, and is a Senior Member of IEEE and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology.

At IBM Research, Alberto has been motivated by the opportunities offered by multi-disciplinary collaborations. Some of his recent projects include the world’s first graphene integrated circuit, the first IEEE standard for 60GHz communications, and radio technology for future 5G mobile communications. Alberto is currently working to derive real-time insights about invisible physical phenomena, and to make these insights available to various industries, including security, quality control, and healthcare.


David Gosset

David Gosset, PhD

Quantum Computing
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


David Gosset, PhD

David Gosset is a research staff member and manager of the theory of quantum algorithms group at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research Center. He completed his PhD in Physics at MIT in 2011 and, before joining IBM, he held post-doctoral fellowships at the University of Waterloo and at Caltech. His research has recently focused on quantum algorithms for small quantum computers and classical simulation algorithms for verification of these devices. He has also investigated the computational power and complexity of quantum many-body systems, and the application of physics-inspired tools from these areas to quantum computer science.


Leo Gross

Leo Gross, PhD

Nanoscopes
IBM Research – Zurich


Leo Gross, PhD

Leo Gross is a Research Staff Member at IBM Research in Zurich. Leo joined IBM after receiving his PhD in Physics from the Free University of Berlin. His work is focused on atomic and molecular manipulation by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), as well as nanostencil lithography. In 2009, he and his coworkers pioneered atomic resolution on molecules by AFM using functionalized tips. Leo is the recipient of the 2012 Feynman Prize for Nanotechnology and the Gerhard Ertl Young Investigator Award in 2010.

Leo is currently working on developing a powerful nanoscope technology that will help gain direct insight of nano-landscapes relevant across industries. The resulting technology will help gain a vantage point into new phenomena and inherent heterogeneity previously not visible, for a deeper understanding on which to build disruptive solutions.


Hendrik Hamann

Hendrik Hamann, PhD

Macroscopes
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Hendrik Hamann, PhD

Hendrik F. Hamann is a Principal Research Staff Member and Senior Research Manager at the T.J. Watson Research Center. He received his PhD from the University of Göttingen in Germany, and since joining IBM, has worked on a wide breadth of projects, from the combination of physical models, machine-learning, and big data technologies; internet of things (IoT), sensor-based physical modeling; system physics with applications in renewable energy; and energy management; as well as nanotechnology.

An IBM Master Inventor and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology, Hendrik has authored and co-authored more than 80 peer-reviewed scientific papers, holds over 90 patents, and has over 70 pending patent applications. A career innovator, he was the first to develop a novel, near-field optical microscope to study single molecules at high spatial resolution. He helped IBM win a Vintage Report Innovation Award for the wine industry, by co-developing a prototype irrigation system based on IoT technology. Outside of the lab, Hendrik is an avid long-distance runner, admiring its simplicity and using it as a means to explore nature.


Bruno Michel

Bruno Michel, PhD

Internet of the Body
IBM Research – Zurich


Bruno Michel, PhD

Bruno Michel works on advanced micro integration at IBM Research – Zurich. He received a PhD in Biochemistry and Biophysics from the University of Zurich, and joined the Zurich lab in 1988, inspired by Physics Nobel laureate Heinrich Rohrer and his work on scanning tunneling microscope. His early work focused on scanning probe microscopy and its applications to molecules and thin organic films. He introduced microcontact printing, and led a project for the development of large-area soft lithography for LCD displays.

Bruno’s current research focuses on developing new a generation of wearables as cognitive companions for humans. He believes the large array of on-body data, once decoded, will yield new possibilities for environmental sensing, cooperative interaction, complex navigation, augmented awareness, and better health. Outside of his research, Bruno is an avid tap dancer, and enjoys hiking and snowboarding in the Swiss Alps — giving him a firsthand look at glacier shrinkage due to global warming.


Chandra Narayanaswami

Chandra Narayanaswami, PhD

Physical Blockchain
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Chandra Narayanaswami, PhD

Chandra is passionate about innovating and tries to deeply influence both the industry and the academic communites, and transitively our society, with his efforts. He earned his PhD in Computer and Systems Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and his BTech in Electrical Engineering from IIT, Bombay. Chandra is an IEEE Fellow, a member of the IBM Academy of Technology, and holds 102 US Patents and 174 patents worldwide.

Chandra is currently investigating applications of blockchain technologies for supply chain, freight and logistics, food safety and provenance. Interesting challenges abound in operating infrastructure and efficiency, business value and financial incentives, organizational dynamics and behaviors in blockchains, data standards and interoperability, in situ blockchain applications, and in enabling data to be born on the blockchain.

Ahmet Ozcan

Ahmet Ozcan, PhD

Machine Intelligence
IBM Research – Almaden


Ahmet Ozcan, PhD

Ahmet S. Ozcan is the manager of the Machine Intelligence group at the IBM Almaden Research Center in California. He received his PhD in Physics from Boston University and joined IBM in 2006. He had worked in IBM’s Microelectronics division and contributed to the development of several CMOS technology nodes, which were commercialized in IBM P and Z server products and in mobile devices through JDA partnerships. In 2015, after an assignment in France on FDSOI technology development, Ahmet took a big interest in brain-inspired computing and moved to Silicon Valley. He and his team work on developing new algorithms guided by neuroscience and cognitive psychology. An IBM Master Inventor, Ahmet has authored and co-authored more than 40 peer-reviewed articles, holds over 45 patents and over 50 pending patent applications. Outside the lab, Ahmet enjoys photography and music.


Jed W Pitera

Jed W Pitera, PhD

Accelerated Materials Discovery
IBM Research – Almaden


Jed Pitera, PhD

Jed Pitera manages the Materials Discovery group at IBM Research Almaden. He joined IBM Research in 2001, and has worked since then to apply computational tools to challenging condensed matter problems, from surfactants to biomolecules to block co-polymers. His team is engaged in developing polymeric materials for lithography, recycling, sensors, and drug delivery. Jed received his PhD in Biophysics from the University of California, San Francisco, where he is an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry.

Jed’s current research focuses on the use of theory and computer simulation to address questions in chemistry and materials science, particularly in the areas of molecular recognition, self-assembly, and computer-aided materials design. A key area of interest is the use of cognitive systems like Watson to accelerate the discovery and development of new materials and processes.


Mark Podlaseck

Mark Podlaseck

Dataspace
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Mark Podlaseck

Mark is the manager of the Dataspace project, which is an adaptive room that facilitates shared understanding. He also manages the design work for the new Q commercial prototype. Prior to that, he served as creative director on the Watson IoT center in Munich and the Watson experience center at Astor Place in New York City.

Mark holds a BA in English and American Literature from UC San Diego and an MA in Computer Science from Cal Poly. He unabashedly cops to being a dropout from a PhD program at Northwestern University, but is particularly proud of his design experience from the School of Hard Knocks.


Patrick Ruch

Patrick Ruch, PhD

Hypertaste
IBM Research – Zurich


Patrick Ruch, PhD

Patrick Ruch is a Research Staff Member in the Science & Technology department at IBM Research – Zurich. Patrick studied Materials Science at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, where he received his PhD degree in 2009 for work on electrochemical capacitors performed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). His main research interests are in energy conversion and storage with applications to efficient computing systems and sustainable energy technologies.

He is currently responsible for exploratory and applied research regarding electrochemical energy conversion, electrochemical sensing and solid sorption heat pump technology.


Robert Wisnieff

Robert Wisnieff, PhD

Future Quantum Leap Project
IBM Research – Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights


Robert Wisnieff, PhD

Dr. Wisnieff joined IBM in 1986 after earning a Ph.D. in Applied Physics. He currently is the Department Group Manager for government projects and Central Scientific Services. He has served as Senior Manager of the Microelectronics Research Laboratory, and Interconnect Technology and the Advanced Display Technology Laboratory. His research contributions include mathematical modeling of the limits of active matrix liquid crystal display performance, including software to model the front of screen performance of displays and invention of an array tester to allow pixel level fault isolation after active matrix fabrication and prior to cell assembly.