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SuperMUC



The Idea

The idea

The road to the zero emission data center

Up to 50 percent of an average air-cooled data center's energy consumption and carbon footprint today is not caused by computing, but by powering the necessary cooling systems. Water cooling technologies, like those used in SuperMUC, can turn this paradigm on its head.

The Idea : SuperMUC rendering
Computer rendition of SuperMUC


The applications IconThe applications Icon

The applications

IBM scientists and developers chose to address this challenge with an innovative concept of hot-water cooling, which eliminates the need for conventional data center air cooling systems. IBM's hot-water cooling technology directly cools active components in the system such as processors and memory modules with coolant temperatures that can reach as high as 113 degrees Fahrenheit, or 45 degrees Celsius. The system can also substantially improve its peak performance while consuming 40 percent less energy than a comparable air-cooled machine.

In SuperMUC, hot water cools 150,000 cores to provide a peak performance of up to three petaflops, which is equivalent to the work of more than 110,000 personal computers.

SuperMUC: First Commercial Hot-Water Cooled Supercomputer to Consume 40% Less Energy
SuperMUC: First Commercial Hot-Water Cooled Supercomputer to Consume 40% Less Energy


The team Icon

The SuperMUC team




Bruno Michel Bruno Michel

Senior Manager,
Contact Information
Advanced Thermal
Packaging, IBM
Research - Zurich

lngmar Meijer lngmar Meijer

Cooling Architect,
IBM Research - Zurich

Stephan Paredes Stephan Paredes

Senior Engineer -
Advanced Thermal
Packaging, IBM
Research - Zurich

The SuperMUC project was the result of a cross-IBM collaboration bringing together a variety of research and technology experts from around the world. Key project team members include:

Charles Archer

Cross Platform Software
IBM Systems &
Technology Group -
Rochester

Klaus Gottschalk

Storage Architect
IBM Systems &
Technology Group -
Germany

Mike Miller

Lead Mechanical
Engineer
IBM Systems &
Technology Group -
Raleigh

Torsten Bloth

System Architect
IBM Systems &
Technology Group -
Germany

Nikolas Heinecke

IBM Global Technology
Services - Germany

Werner Schaible

Hardware Power
Systems
IBM Global
Technology Services -
ITS Site and Facilities Services
Germany

Luigi Brochard, Ph.D.

Deep Computing
Solution Architect
IBM Sales &
Distribution, STG
Sales - France

Vinod Kamath, Ph.D.

Lead Thermal
Engineer
IBM Systems &
Technology Group -
Raleigh

Mark Steinke, Ph.D.

Thermal Engineer
IBM Systems &
Technology Group - Raleigh

Kiril Dragnev

Project Manager:
Server Optimization &
Integration Services
IBM Global Technology
Services - Germany

Hawk Lin

Advisory Hardware
Development Engineer
IBM Systems &
Technology Group -
Taiwan

Jamil Wakil, Ph.D.

Thermal Analysis &
Test
IBM Systems &
Technology Group -
Austin

Andreas Foerster

IT Specialist
IBM Global
Technology Services -
Germany

Vic Mahaney, Ph.D.

Thermal Engineer
IBM Systems &
Technology Group - Austin

Scott Womble

Packaging Design
IBM Systems &
Technology Group -
Raleigh



The labs Icon

The labs

IBM Research - Zurich
Rüschlikon, Switzerland

IBM Böblingen Development Center
Böblingen, Germany

The Leibniz Supercomputing Center (LRZ)
The Leibniz Supercomputing Center (LRZ)


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